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J0110

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Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #1 
I'm hoping for a bit of advice please, would be very interested in any thoughts or suggestions anyone may have on a situation that I find rather puzzling.

I recently had UTI symptoms (burning on weeing, odd pains in urethal and bladder area, frequency) and got given 3 days of trimethoprim by my GP, which didn't really do too much. I then discovered d-mannose and after a few weeks I no longer have any discomfort and urine dip sticks are all clear. My doctor sent off a sample to check and the NHS lab results were all negative. However I read that the NHS tests are a bit unreliable so I had a private urine test done (microscopy and culture) and was concerned to get the results which showed nothing under the microscope but three different bugs from the culture: E coli >100,000, and strep group B and acinetobacter johnsonii at lower levels (10,000-100,000), and suggesting a whole battery of possible antibiotics I should discuss with my GP. I am getting another test done to confirm but if that is positive then I will see my GP and discuss treatment options. However I am reluctant to take more drugs because (a) the last lot clearly didn't work, (b) I don't have symptoms and (c) I managed to control the symptoms with d-mannose in the past and feel I could do so again if necessary. Of course I don't want to risk anything nasty though so I'm wondering if this conservative approach is reasonable. I should also add that my test results were negative for everything else including white and red blood cells, protein etc. I'm also drinking lots of water and trying to keep my pH neutral or slightly alkaline.

I'd be really interested to know what people make of these test results and whether I should be concerned or not by the presence of these bugs in the absence of symptoms, white blood cells, inflammation etc.

Thank you all for reading!
Moderatorsusan

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Posts: 932
Reply with quote  #2 
I would discuss with your GP and see what they advise. It really depends on how you feel. If you have no symptoms and can control things with DM on a daily maintenance dose then perhaps stick with that and avoid abs and the gut issues they can cause. However slightest sign of trouble then back on the abs. If the second test comes back positive for E. coli then perhaps a course of abs for 2 weeks may help and take it from there. Yes an incorrectly infection long term can cause problems so its best to monitor and see how you feel. Obviously if you start to get kidney pain, feel nauseous, run a fever or get the usual UTI symptoms then you must treat appropriately.

I know that one specialist if he analyses urine and sees no wbcs and you are feeling symptom free will advise that you stay off abs but at the slightest twinge you jump straight on them.
J0110

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Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you very much, Susan. That sounds like excellent advice and is very helpful. What a brilliant forum this is. I am so grateful to have found you.

It does make me a bit cross though that we have to pay privately to get proper tests done and also to buy d-mannose. It seems from this forum and also many other places including patient.info, that the NHS knows very well that their tests are unreliable and that d-mannose works, often better than antibiotics (and without the side effects). Does anyone know of a campaign to get better testing and treatment offered on the NHS? I'm not wealthy and I rather resent having to pay £69 time after time to find out if I actually need antibiotics and, if I take them, whether they did the job. Multiply that by all the thousands of people in a similar position and all the money wasted on useless NHS tests, not to mention repeat visits to GPs owing to poor diagnosis and it must be costing a fortune to both patients and the health service. I would happily join a campaign to fight for a better deal for us. If anyone can point me to such a project I would be very grateful.
J0110

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Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #4 
Just wanted to post this quickly in case of interest to others. It seems that medical opinion agrees that there's no advantage in giving antibiotics for bacteria in the urine in the absence of symptoms - see for example http://www.cochrane.org/CD009534/RENAL_antibiotic-treatment-for-asymptomatic-bacteriuria and http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2059290-overview
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