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Icy

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Posts: 428
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,

Article as appeared in Daily Mail online today. Sadly it does not go far enough as it never mentions the new fully acknowledged condition of Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) as recognised in the USA. However, it is at least another article highlighting the dangers of gluten and the auto-immunity that it brings with it. One thing it does miss out is that there is often cross-reactivity with other grains such as rice, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat and other foods that the body can misinterpret as gluten.

Worth a read:

500,000 of us are secret coeliacs: Only 24% of people who have condition are diagnosed

  • Coeliac disease affects one in every 100 people in the UK
  • The only treatment is a life-long gluten-free diet

By BEN SPENCER

Half a million people in Britain are living with coeliac disease without knowing it, according to new research.

The disease, a digestive condition which leads to an adverse reaction to gluten in foods such as bread and pasta, can lead to a range of other medical problems if it is not diagnosed.

Research by the University of Nottingham has found that only 24 per cent of people with the autoimmune condition are diagnosed.

 
Coeliac is a digestive condition which leads to an adverse reaction to gluten in foods such as bread and pasta

Coeliac is a digestive condition which leads to an adverse reaction to gluten in foods such as bread and pasta

 

The rate of diagnosis has increased four-fold in the last two decades, according to the study in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Far more needs to be done to identify sufferers said Sarah Sleet, the chief executive of Coeliac UK.

She said: ‘This latest research shows that nearly a quarter of people with coeliac disease have now been diagnosed and gives an up to date picture of the diagnosis levels across the UK.

 

 

‘Of course, increasing numbers with a diagnosis is good news and will inevitably mean that there will be an increased demand for gluten-free products in supermarkets.

‘But the three quarters undiagnosed - around 500,000 people - is a shocking statistic that needs urgent action.’

 
Pasta is delicious for most of us but not if you are a coeliac

Pasta is delicious for most of us but not if you are a coeliac

 

Calling for supermarkets to stock at least eight core items of gluten-free food, she added: ‘Can you imagine going into your local supermarket and there is no bread you can eat, not one loaf, not one slice?

‘And when you check out the pasta, cereal or flour again there is nothing available on the shelf which means you have to trawl around two or three stores in order to be able to find your staple foods.

‘This is not about your preferred brand but about the major supermarkets ensuring that they have sufficient stock in all their stores whatever their size for this growing market of people who depend on gluten-free food for their health.’

Coeliac disease affects one in every 100 people in the UK. The only treatment is a life-long gluten-free diet.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley and rye and can be found in any food containing these cereals including pasta, most types of bread, breakfast cereals, cakes and some other foods.

 


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2625857/500-000-secret-coeliacs-Only-24-people-condition-diagnosed.html#ixzz31UO2IL3L 
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jeananne

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Posts: 227
Reply with quote  #2 
Thank you so much for putting this info on the forum.  It is so relevant to whats been going on in my own life.  I do know that I am not allergic to Wheat/gluten by it appears that I do overload on it and it has been making me ill.  When my bladder was at its worse I began excluding one thing at a time from my diet.  Nothing influenced my bladder unfortunately but I found that the condition I had bee diagnosed with "fibromyalgia" began to get better when I went on a gluten free diet.  I also, several years ago got a condition called PMR which is a auto-immune condition. So I came to the conclusion that all my little ailments and aches and pains could be down to eating too much wheat.  I now try to have just one item of wheat a day and that seems to suit me.  God, I wish it had helped my bladder too.
Icy

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Posts: 428
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Jeanne,

There is one very vital issue with regard to gluten and in fact any foodstuff or other environmental trigger (i.e. chemical, bacteria) and this is that:  it only takes one tiny speck of a foodstuff to set up antibodies in the body against that food so you have to eliminate everything. That immune response can also last in the body for 3 or more months.  So an example would be:

If you eat a crumb of gluten, not even a whole plate of it, your body will immediately alert itself and flood itself with antibodies against that substance as the body is highly sensitive to it. Even the smallest amount will trigger a response, a cascade of the antibodies all firing off at once.  Even if you totally stop eating that gluten very strictly keeping it out from the time you injested that one crumb,  your body can still be firing the antibodies for another 2 weeks.   Those antibodies will very gradually reduce - only if you are totally excluding that food. If you aren't excluding it, they will continue to form.

But.... those antibodies will stay in the system for 3 months or more, so one can be continually subjecting the system to antibodies.   This happens with other sensitive foods not just gluten - all foods will behave like this that one is sensitive to.  So that is why one may not feel better from just briefly excluding foods or just still eating one crumb of the food.   It's a nightmare really!




jeananne

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Posts: 227
Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for the reply.  i do appreciate how intricate the whole problem is when certain food stuffs do more harm than good.  I did not have any symptoms of tummy troubles, just aching limbs and tiredness.  I have been eating one portion of wheat each day now for several months and even that has helped me so I will stick to that if nothing changes.  When I experimented with a gluten free diet I found it terribly hard because the gluten free food I felt was awful.  Of course if you have to have this diet, you have to put up with it. I hope your not badly affected and perhaps you feel being allergic to wheat may hurt your bladder too?
Icy

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Posts: 428
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi,

Yes, gluten definitely affects my bladder - I think I am also sensitive to other grain too, but not sure which ones as it is always difficult to pin them down.

The gluten free food in the shops (that is the substitute gluten free, free from ranges etc) are all complete rubbish - full of sugar, and generally poor quality ingredients.

So if you are doing a gluten free diet it is always best to just eat other foods and not look for the classic alternatives like the gluten free breads, gluten free cakes etc. You just have to change your whole mindset about food. Really hard.
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